American Ego: Shock Corridor

10.20.18

Part 1: Unbridled Ambition

This is the first in a five-part series entitled AMERICAN EGO in which we invite the audience to view this selection of Classical Hollywood cinema with a critical eye to its preconceptions and depictions of success. 

"Reporter Johnny Barrett (Peter Breck) wants to win a Pulitzer Prize, and he’ll do whatever it takes, even clandestinely negotiating a diagnosis of insanity to get access to a scoop. He has himself committed to a mental hospital to investigate an unsolved murder. As he closes in on the killer, sanity slips from his tenuous grasp when he is confronted with a black man who believes he's the Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, a nuclear physicist who has regressed to the mental age of six, and a number of other strange inmates, all of whom have been transformed into the people they dislike the most. This film engages in commentary on racism, mental health and other controversial issues in 1960s America and features audacious photography by Stanley Cortez. Samuel Fuller masterfully charts the uneasy terrain between sanity and madness."

Program notes and program by Ashley Cooper.

Ashley Cooper is a Location Coordinator for film and TV productions based in Chicago. She is a cinephile who has a passion for classic American cinema.

SHOCK CORRIDOR 
by Samuel Fuller
1963, digital projection, 101 min

Saturday, October 20 at 7:00PM

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Violent Civilization

10.25.18

“Filmmaker Adam Khalil in person to present two recent films: THE VIOLENCE OF A CIVILIZATION WITHOUT SECRETS & INAATE/SE/ [IT SHINES A CERTAIN WAY. TO A CERTAIN PLACE/ IT FLIES. IT FALLS/]

These films first screened in the program Violent Civilization curated by Dessane Lopez Cassell as a part of the FLAHERTY NYC: AFTERMATH at Anthology Film Archives on 10/1/18. Co-presented with The Flaherty, we are grateful to have it travel to Chicago!

'“Violent Civilization” considers the settler-colonial state as living, breathing, and thoroughly contemporary matter. Eschewing the tendency to historicize the oppression and displacement of indigenous communities in the United States, the films presented here by Adam Khalil...re-imagine and re-contextualize contemporary native identity. Based on the ancient Anishinaabe Seven Fires Prophecy which both predates and predicts the arrival of Europeans, INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place./it flies. falls./] blends documentary, narrative, and experimental elements to explore the resonance of the prophecy through generations in their specific Ojibway community in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Reflecting on the innate violence of museum archives and the relegation of human beings to artifacts, THE VIOLENCE OF A CIVILIZATION WITHOUT SECRETS considers the case––and consequences––of the “discovery” of the “Kennewick Man,” a prehistoric Paleo-American man whose remains were found in Kennewick, Washington, in 1996."––Dessane Lopez Cassell

The screenings will be followed by a discussion with the director.

THE VIOLENCE OF A CIVILIZATION WITHOUT SECRETS
by Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil, and Jackson Polys
2017, digital projection, 10 min

INAATE/SE/ [it shines 
a certain way. to a certain place./it flies. falls./].
by Adam Khalil and Zack Khalil
2016, digital projection, 68 min

Total run time: 78 min
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Adam Shingwak Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Adam's work has been exhibited at UnionDocs, e-flux, Maysles Cinema, Microscope Gallery (New York), Museo ExTeresa Arte Actual (Mexico City), Spektrum (Berlin), Trailer Gallery (Sweden), Carnival of eCreativity (Bombay), and Fine Art Film Festival Szolnok (Hungary). Khalil is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2011 he graduated from the Film and Electronic Arts program at Bard College.

Thursday, October 25 at 7:30PM

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Don't Look Now

10.28.18

It's October, there's a newfound chill in the air, and we're in the mood for something spooky so we're screening one of filmfront's favorite occult thrillers: the mysterious, supernatural, tragic, experimental, sonic and visual delight that is Nicholas Roeg's DON'T LOOK NOW.

Marketed as a "psychic thriller", Don't Look Now has perhaps become more well known for a sex scene that pushed boundaries in 1973 than the many elements that make it so unique in the horror genre: an uncompromising meditation on a couple's experience of grief, a chimeric soundscape, an experimental approach to editing (and its connections to foresight), and large-scale use of Venice as an evolving theater-maze through which psychic fantoms perturb our protagonists.

"Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie mesmerize as a married couple on an extended trip to Venice following a family tragedy. While in that elegantly decaying city, they have a series of inexplicable, terrifying, and increasingly dangerous experiences. A masterpiece from Nicolas Roeg, Don’t Look Now, adapted from a story by Daphne du Maurier, is a brilliantly disturbing tale of the supernatural, as renowned for its innovative editing and haunting cinematography as its naturalistic eroticism and unforgettable climax and denouement, one of the great endings in horror history."––Criterion Collection

DON'T LOOK NOW
by Nicholas Roeg
1973, digital projection, 110 min

Sunday, October 28 at 7:00 PM