Growing Up

03.16.19

In March and April, we present a selection of three films from the New Taiwan Cinema of the 1980s. Featuring acclaimed filmmakers Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-Hsien, the movement represents a moment when Taiwan sought to define itself from the dominant influence of Hong Kong cinema in the previous decades. With government sponsorship, Yang, Hou, and their collaborators crafted work that dwelt on the relationship between urban and rural spaces, responding to a period of rapid industrialization that threatened the latter. The series begins with GROWING UP, the first feature to attract attention to the New Taiwan Cinema, and continues with two films from Yang and Hou.

Part I of IN OUR TIME: NEW TAIWAN CINEMA

"Filmmaker Chen Kun-hou was both colleague and mentor for Hou in the early 1980s. He served as cinematographer for most of Hou’s first features, and Hou in turn co-wrote the screenplay for GROWING UP, Chen’s most important contribution to the emergence of the Taiwanese New Wave. Like so much of Hou’s early work, the film is a coming-of-age tale about a boy in 1950s Taiwan. The sentimentality of the plot’s nostalgic appeal is complicated by the film’s careful attention to the tensions between the native Taiwanese and the recently arrived mainlanders. Working on the screenplay with the original novel’s author Chu Tien-wen, Hou began one of the most important artistic partnerships of his career; Chu has contributed to the screenplays of almost all of Hou’s subsequent films."––Harvard Film Archive

Programmed with Brian Belak from Chicago Film Archives. 16mm prints from Chicago Film Archives.

GROWING UP
Chen Kun-Hou
1983, 16mm, 100 min

Saturday, March 16 at 7:00PM

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The Terrorizers

03.30.19

Part II of IN OUR TIME: NEW TAIWAN CINEMA

"Yang crafts a mesmerizing, enigmatic thriller about fate, urban existence, and violence, both physical and emotional. On a sunny day in Taipei, shots ring out from an apartment complex and a body lies dead in the streets. In the aftermath of the crime, the lives of seemingly disparate people—including a couple whose marriage is dissolving, a photographer, and a sociopathic young woman—begin to intersect, connected by the shooting and an insidious prank phone call that will shape the course of their existences. Constructed like a puzzle, THE TERRORIZERS maintains an air of quietly creeping unease as it builds towards its shattering, mind-scrambling denouement."––BAMcinématek

Programmed with Brian Belak from Chicago Film Archives. 16mm prints from Chicago Film Archives.

THE TERRORIZERS
by Edward Yang
1986, 16mm, 109 min

Saturday, March 30 at 7:00PM